{"id":4632187633751,"title":"AECC Practice Guide Course","handle":"966694","description":"\u003cp data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eWelcome to our short online course where together we will be exploring specific elements withing the principles of the Aboriginal Early Childhood Practice Guide (Staines and Scarlet 2018).\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eMake sure you purchase a copy of the \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/aboriginalecc.com\/collections\/books\/products\/the-aboriginal-early-childhood-practice-guide\"\u003eAboriginal Early Childhood Practice Guide here.\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eIn this short course, we will be unpacking each of the Principles included in the Practice Guide, taking our knowledge a little deeper each week.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003ePrinciple One: Respect of and for Aboriginal people and their diverse cultures. \u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003eEducators embarking on a journey to learn more about Aboriginal people and culture, can often become frustrated by barriers they encounter when trying to access information or form connections with community.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003ePrinciple Two: Being Culturally Responsive and Resourceful\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003eEducators who are culturally responsive have a strong understanding of how to build authentic relationships with children. Culturally responsive educators are able to contextualise curriculum so the cultural perspectives of children are embedded throughout and not separated.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eEducators who are culturally resourceful are able to seek out ways of connecting, walking with and building belonging through significant community links, family and child relationships. Being both culturally responsive and resourceful requires educators to consider the physical places and spaces.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003ePrinciple Three: Children Thriving\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003eEducators who place value on children's capacity to surpass expectations, age and cultural knowledges, are engaging with the Aboriginal practise of being grown up by country. Educators resist normative development milestones and cultural stereotypes when they're planning for Aboriginal children's development.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003ePrinciple Four: Embedding Practices\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e Educators plan holistically, and ensure that an Aboriginal perspective is included in context to what the children are genuinely interested in. It means that educators don't teach about Aboriginal perspectives as if they are a topic, a theme, or an interest, and they avoid using stereotypical depictions of Aboriginal people and our culture.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003ePrinciple Five: Anti-Bias Approaches\u003c\/strong\u003e \u003cbr\u003eEducators who are committed to embedding Aboriginal perspectives also need to engage with anti-bias approaches – in particular non-Indigenous educators. Anti-bias approaches are for everyone, they are not simply designed to ‘include’ children who identify or appear different from the norm. Aboriginal peoples are not a homogenous cultural group, therefore the ways in which they identify includes, gender, sexuality, class, language, abilities, and, geographical region. \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2020-10-08T13:14:25+11:00","created_at":"2020-10-07T09:40:38+11:00","vendor":"Thinkific","type":"Course","tags":["Course","Practice Guide","Thinkific"],"price":0,"price_min":0,"price_max":0,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":1995,"compare_at_price_min":1995,"compare_at_price_max":1995,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":32374209151063,"title":"Individual","option1":"Individual","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"PGCourse001","requires_shipping":false,"taxable":false,"featured_image":{"id":14646698901591,"product_id":4632187633751,"position":1,"created_at":"2020-10-08T13:04:09+11:00","updated_at":"2020-10-08T13:04:09+11:00","alt":null,"width":1080,"height":1080,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0077\/7433\/9123\/products\/CopyofPRACTICEGUIDECOURSE.png?v=1602122649","variant_ids":[32374209151063]},"available":true,"name":"AECC Practice Guide Course - Individual","public_title":"Individual","options":["Individual"],"price":0,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":1995,"inventory_management":null,"barcode":"","featured_media":{"alt":null,"id":6820246028375,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":1080,"width":1080,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0077\/7433\/9123\/products\/CopyofPRACTICEGUIDECOURSE.png?v=1602122649"}}}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0077\/7433\/9123\/products\/CopyofPRACTICEGUIDECOURSE.png?v=1602122649"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0077\/7433\/9123\/products\/CopyofPRACTICEGUIDECOURSE.png?v=1602122649","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":6820246028375,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":1080,"width":1080,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0077\/7433\/9123\/products\/CopyofPRACTICEGUIDECOURSE.png?v=1602122649"},"aspect_ratio":1.0,"height":1080,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0077\/7433\/9123\/products\/CopyofPRACTICEGUIDECOURSE.png?v=1602122649","width":1080}],"content":"\u003cp data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eWelcome to our short online course where together we will be exploring specific elements withing the principles of the Aboriginal Early Childhood Practice Guide (Staines and Scarlet 2018).\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eMake sure you purchase a copy of the \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/aboriginalecc.com\/collections\/books\/products\/the-aboriginal-early-childhood-practice-guide\"\u003eAboriginal Early Childhood Practice Guide here.\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eIn this short course, we will be unpacking each of the Principles included in the Practice Guide, taking our knowledge a little deeper each week.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003ePrinciple One: Respect of and for Aboriginal people and their diverse cultures. \u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003eEducators embarking on a journey to learn more about Aboriginal people and culture, can often become frustrated by barriers they encounter when trying to access information or form connections with community.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003ePrinciple Two: Being Culturally Responsive and Resourceful\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003eEducators who are culturally responsive have a strong understanding of how to build authentic relationships with children. Culturally responsive educators are able to contextualise curriculum so the cultural perspectives of children are embedded throughout and not separated.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eEducators who are culturally resourceful are able to seek out ways of connecting, walking with and building belonging through significant community links, family and child relationships. Being both culturally responsive and resourceful requires educators to consider the physical places and spaces.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003ePrinciple Three: Children Thriving\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003eEducators who place value on children's capacity to surpass expectations, age and cultural knowledges, are engaging with the Aboriginal practise of being grown up by country. Educators resist normative development milestones and cultural stereotypes when they're planning for Aboriginal children's development.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003ePrinciple Four: Embedding Practices\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e Educators plan holistically, and ensure that an Aboriginal perspective is included in context to what the children are genuinely interested in. It means that educators don't teach about Aboriginal perspectives as if they are a topic, a theme, or an interest, and they avoid using stereotypical depictions of Aboriginal people and our culture.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003ePrinciple Five: Anti-Bias Approaches\u003c\/strong\u003e \u003cbr\u003eEducators who are committed to embedding Aboriginal perspectives also need to engage with anti-bias approaches – in particular non-Indigenous educators. Anti-bias approaches are for everyone, they are not simply designed to ‘include’ children who identify or appear different from the norm. Aboriginal peoples are not a homogenous cultural group, therefore the ways in which they identify includes, gender, sexuality, class, language, abilities, and, geographical region. \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e"}

AECC Practice Guide Course

Product Description

Welcome to our short online course where together we will be exploring specific elements withing the principles of the Aboriginal Early Childhood Practice Guide (Staines and Scarlet 2018).

Make sure you purchase a copy of the Aboriginal Early Childhood Practice Guide here.

In this short course, we will be unpacking each of the Principles included in the Practice Guide, taking our knowledge a little deeper each week.

Principle One: Respect of and for Aboriginal people and their diverse cultures.
Educators embarking on a journey to learn more about Aboriginal people and culture, can often become frustrated by barriers they encounter when trying to access information or form connections with community.

 

Principle Two: Being Culturally Responsive and Resourceful
Educators who are culturally responsive have a strong understanding of how to build authentic relationships with children. Culturally responsive educators are able to contextualise curriculum so the cultural perspectives of children are embedded throughout and not separated.

Educators who are culturally resourceful are able to seek out ways of connecting, walking with and building belonging through significant community links, family and child relationships. Being both culturally responsive and resourceful requires educators to consider the physical places and spaces.

 

Principle Three: Children Thriving
Educators who place value on children's capacity to surpass expectations, age and cultural knowledges, are engaging with the Aboriginal practise of being grown up by country. Educators resist normative development milestones and cultural stereotypes when they're planning for Aboriginal children's development.

 

Principle Four: Embedding Practices
Educators plan holistically, and ensure that an Aboriginal perspective is included in context to what the children are genuinely interested in. It means that educators don't teach about Aboriginal perspectives as if they are a topic, a theme, or an interest, and they avoid using stereotypical depictions of Aboriginal people and our culture.

 

Principle Five: Anti-Bias Approaches 
Educators who are committed to embedding Aboriginal perspectives also need to engage with anti-bias approaches – in particular non-Indigenous educators. Anti-bias approaches are for everyone, they are not simply designed to ‘include’ children who identify or appear different from the norm. Aboriginal peoples are not a homogenous cultural group, therefore the ways in which they identify includes, gender, sexuality, class, language, abilities, and, geographical region. 

 

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