News

RSS
Deadly Aboriginal Artists - Baker Boy

Deadly Aboriginal Artists - Baker Boy

Danzal Baker was born in Darwin and grew up in the Arnhem Land communities of Milingimbi and Maningrida. His totem is the olive python his moiety is Dhuwa and his skin name is Burralung.

He developed his love of dancing and acting at the Aboriginal Centre for the performing Arts, Brisbane. He was an original member of the Djuki Mala dance troupe.

In 2016, Baker appeared on the "Indigenous" episode of the Australian television series You Can’t Ask That on ABC.

In 2016, he was part of a group of artists who, in an effort to inspire the world to dance, move and absorb the Yolgnu style created the video "Yolgnu Style", a contemporary dance music video.

In 2017 Baker Boy won the Triple J Unearthed National Indigenous Music Awards.

Baker Boy made his acting debut in True History of The Kelly Gang released in cinemas in early January 2019.

He appeared on Playschool as part of NAIDOC week 2019 singing Hickory Dickory Dock.

He has said that he wants to be an inspiration to indigenous kids living in remote communities, and to combat "shame."

Baker Boy appeared on Play School performing a wild and wonderful version of Hickory Dickory Doc!

https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=351200238905619&extid=hECDhu1E49oxvGgI

 

Deadly Aboriginal Artist - Chico Monks

Deadly Aboriginal Artist - Chico Monks

Chico Monks  1978-2019

Chico Monks is a Post-war & Contemporary artist. His work was featured in several exhibitions at key galleries and museums. He is from a family of artists and is known for his sculpture, painting and performance. He has exhibited widely at galleries and cultural festivals and uses his work to explore identity. He won the 2014 Gili Award for Teaching.

From a very young age Chico was to a variety of diverse environments from his rainforest home to Europe and the United Kingdom. His parent, both teaching and practising artists encouraged him to express himself through the arts as part of everyday life.

His talents were recognised early. He graduated from Southern Cross University in 2001 with a BA in sculpture. He taught Aboriginal art in various schools, organizations and communities, including Juvenile Justice and Long Bay Gaol 

His works are in the collection of Wollongong Art Gallery acquired through Wollongong City Council. 

He is the artist whose sculpture appears on the cover of The Anti-Bias Approach in Early Childhood 3rd Edition entitled ‘No Photos Please’.

Deadly Aboriginal Artists - Mo’Ju

Deadly Aboriginal Artists - Mo’Ju

Mojo Ruiz de Luzuriaga, known professionally as Mo'Ju, is an ARIA nominated Australian musician, best-known for her 2018 album Native Tongue and the lead single of the same title. The single won the Best Independent Single category in the 2019 AIR Awards. She is a singer-songwriter who has created music in a number of genres.

Deadly Aboriginal Artists - Miranda Tapsell

Deadly Aboriginal Artists - Miranda Tapsell

 “I had some very influential women in my life, both in my career and in my personal life. My mother, my aunties on both Mum and Dad’s sides, and my grandmothers. I have been surrounded by such strong women and all of them had something to contribute to my growing up in some way.”

Miranda Tapsell was born in Darwin on 18 June 1987 to Tony and Barbara Tapsell. A proud Larrakia and Tiwi woman, Miranda says she had a happy, comfortable childhood. Her dad was the town clerk of the Jabiru Town Council and her mother was a teacher.

The family then moved to Jabiru in West Arnhem Land, where she grew up. In 2004, when she was 16, she won the Bell Shakespeare Company regional performance scholarship and later moved to Sydney to study at (NIDA). She graduated in 2008.

From her debut in Yibilung at the Belvoir Theatre in 2008, Miranda has performed in a wide variety of genre, including stage, television, and cinema, including her role as Bonita in the Mabo miniseries and Cynthia, one of The Sapphires, and her role in the Channel 9 series Love Child to name just a few.

In May 2015 she received two Logie awards in for Best New Talent, and Most Outstanding Newcomer. In her acceptance speech she urged people in the audience to "Put more beautiful people of colour on TV and connect viewers in ways which transcend race and unite us," adding, "That’s the real team Australia.”

Miranda starred in the ground breaking Acknowledgment of Country episode of Play School.

https://iview.abc.net.au/show/play-school-acknowledgement-of-country

Deadly Aboriginal Artists - Vernon Ah Kee

Deadly Aboriginal Artists - Vernon Ah Kee

Vernon Ah Kee, born in 1967, is an Australian award-winning artist and founding member of ProppaNOW. His art focuses on Aboriginal Australian identity and its place within a modern Australian framework.Ah Kee uses a broad range of techniques and media such as painting, installation photography, video and text-based art.

In 2003, Ah Kee, along with other Indigenous Australian artists, created ProppaNOW – an organisation dedicated to supporting urban Indigenous artists in Brisbane in an effort to dispel cultural stereotypes.

Vernon Ah Kee is a member of the Kuku Yalandji, Waanji, Yidinji and Gugu Yimithirr peoples. His works include large-scale drawings of his ancestors as well as text-based works and installations. Ah Kee combines the history of colonisation with race political issues to address underlying racism in Australian society.

Ah Kee represented Australia at the 2009 Venice Biennale in the group exhibition Once Removed. His works are shown internationally as well as domestically in both public and private collections.

Ah Kee’s work is shown in a number of private and public collections in Australia and overseas.

Vernon Ah Kee’s video installation tall man bears witness to a tragic abuse of power in November 2004 on Queensland’s Palm Island. An Aboriginal man, Cameron Doomadgee, died in police custody. In tall man Ah Kee combines local news footage of the event, along with mobile phone coverage and video filmed by police officers from inside Palm Island police station to tell a powerful story of injustice.

He was awarded the Australia Council’s Visual Arts Fellowship in 2018.

Deadly Aboriginal Artists - Nayuka Gorrie

Deadly Aboriginal Artists - Nayuka Gorrie

“Despite attempts to kill us off, assimilate us, we are still here. This truth is a thorn in the colonial side. As our physical human form persists, our land and our claim to it too remains. Despite land theft, pollution, “development” and unsustainable white farming practices, sacred places still exist.”

Nayuka is a Gunai, Gunditmara, Wiradjuri and Yorta Yorta writer. Nayuka’s writing spans social commentary on black, queer and feminist politics to television writing. They are a 2018 Wheeler Next Chapter recipient and their work has been described as exploring "black, queer and feminist politics," satire,  and blerd ("black plus nerd") culture.. They’re writing appears in Queerstories, Going Postal and Growing Up Queer in Australia anthology.

In 2018, Nayuka wrote and performed in the ABC series Black Comedy and has co-written episodes of Get Kracki!n. Nayuka is also a co-writer of five-part children’s television series Thalu. “a celebration of the Pilbara region and its Indigenous culture"

In November 2019 Nayuka appeared on an episode of Q&A that was aired in conjunction with Broadside Feminist Ideas Festival, where she called for the police to be abolished, stating it is "there to be violent, it is patriarchal, it is overwhelmingly white". The episode was later controversially pulled from steaming service iView after receiving a number of complaints about the episode.

Nayuka is a freelance writer for The Guardian Australia and have written for various Australian publications. Their writing has covered topics such as the need for a treaty rather than constitutional recognition of Indigenous people in Australia, a critique of white feminism, and racism within the criminal justice system and in society.

 

  • Sonya Forrest
Deadly Aboriginal Artists - Uncle Jack Charles

Deadly Aboriginal Artists - Uncle Jack Charles

Uncle Jack Charles was born to a Wiradjuri father and a Bunurong mother in an aboriginal reserve on the Murray river. His great-great-grandfather was among the activists who resisted government policy in Victoria in 1881.

Deadly Aboriginal Artists - Adam Briggs

Deadly Aboriginal Artists - Adam Briggs

Adam Briggs was born on the 28th of August 1986, growing up in Shepparton, Victoria.  He performs as Briggs and describes himself as Senator Briggs although he is not actually a member of Parliament.

Deadly Aboriginal Artist Series - Cyndy Newman

Deadly Aboriginal Artist Series - Cyndy Newman

Cyndy Newman Kalare Woman of Wiradjuri Country Griffith and Condobolin is an artist, early childhood teacher and found of Fb Group Indigenous Perspectives in Early Childhood.
  • Sonya Forrest
Deadly Aboriginal Artist Series - Steven Oliver

Deadly Aboriginal Artist Series - Steven Oliver

Born in Cloncurry, Steven Oliver is a descendant of the Kukuyalanji, Waanyi, Gangalidda, Woppaburra, Bundjalung and Biripi peoples.

He trained as a dancer, actor and singer in the Aboriginal Music Theatre Training Program and at WAAPA. He is also a performance poet.

Deadly Aboriginal Artist Series - Saretta Fielding

Deadly Aboriginal Artist Series - Saretta Fielding

Saretta Fielding is Wonnarua Woman with strong connections to the Hunter Valley in NSW. The beautiful Lake Macquarie, surrounding bushlands, Watagan Mountains and the beaches have inspired each and every one of Sarettas Art Works.
  • Jessica Staines
Deadly Aboriginal Artists Series - Merindahs

Deadly Aboriginal Artists Series - Merindahs

Merindah Funnell is a proud Wiradjuri artist, a freelance illustrator, who also works at the MCA as an artist educator in the National Centre for Creative Learning. Working as a street artist with various city councils, festivals and schools to create large scale murals she has gained international recognition.