News

RSS
What do you really know about dot painting?

What do you really know about dot painting?

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art always needs to be sensitively treated by educators. It should always be attributed to the artists, and accompanied by Indigenous voices to explain it, so that children encounter it within its cultural context.
Questions from the Koori Curriculum Educator Community About Art Answered

Questions from the Koori Curriculum Educator Community About Art Answered

Questions from the Koori Curriculum Educator Community About Art Answered
  • Jessica Staines
Illustrations as Springboards For Learning

Illustrations as Springboards For Learning

Illustrations created by Aboriginal artists can serve as great provocations for discussion and learning. Here are some ideas of how we can extend upon and deepen children’s interactions with illustrations.

Top 5 Aboriginal Illustrators

Top 5 Aboriginal Illustrators

Illustrations in Aboriginal children’s books are a fantastic way to bring Aboriginal art into ones classroom. I personally adore the works of many Aboriginal illustrators it’s hard to pick my top ten. However, I have done my best and tried to pick a diverse range of art styles.
  • Jessica Staines
Cross Crossing Culture in Engaging With Aboriginal Artists and Art

Cross Crossing Culture in Engaging With Aboriginal Artists and Art

When I think about engaging with Aboriginal art and artists in my curriculum planning I’m always careful to begin with the Anti-Bias Goals and Anti-Bias Actions (Scarlet, 2020).
Contemporary Aboriginal music is cultural knowledge

Contemporary Aboriginal music is cultural knowledge

Contemporary Aboriginal music can be a safe and approachable common ground for non-indigenous people to learn about Aboriginal culture, and share in public conversations about what Australia has been and could become.
Aboriginal art as a form of valid cultural knowledge

Aboriginal art as a form of valid cultural knowledge

Aboriginal art is never merely decoration, it is linked into a culture that is threatened and complex. It preserves and sustains that culture, and expresses it to modern Australia.

Can non-Indigenous people do Aboriginal art?

Can non-Indigenous people do Aboriginal art?

The short answer to this one, is no, you can’t. Many artists and art critics believe that all art is derivative – that it is it builds on or is copied from another source. When you were in school you may have been asked to do a copy of a famous artwork such as Vincent Van Gogh’s Sunflowers or asked to do a painting in the style of an artist such as Picasso or Matisse. Art is often built on what previous artists have created.

The Do’s and Don’ts when it comes to Aboriginal Art

The Do’s and Don’ts when it comes to Aboriginal Art

Many early childhood educators experience extreme anxiety when it comes to including Aboriginal perspectives in their program. Additionally, Aboriginal art seems to be a highly controversial subject of which there is lots of conflicting advice.
How do we use Aboriginal art?

How do we use Aboriginal art?

How do we use Aboriginal art and items from Aboriginal culture in our services? Are we being respectful of the pieces we may have acquired and are we aware of the deep connection between art and country, identity and belonging for Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islanders?
Ways to include Aboriginal Art

Ways to include Aboriginal Art

When considering ways to engage and expose children to Aboriginal art there are two main ways that I like to explore.
Deadly Aboriginal Artists - Baker Boy

Deadly Aboriginal Artists - Baker Boy

Danzal Baker was born in Darwin and grew up in the Arnhem Land communities of Milingimbi and Maningrida. His totem is the olive python his moiety is Dhuwa and his skin name is Burralung.

He developed his love of dancing and acting at the Aboriginal Centre for the performing Arts, Brisbane. He was an original member of the Djuki Mala dance troupe.

In 2016, Baker appeared on the "Indigenous" episode of the Australian television series You Can’t Ask That on ABC.

In 2016, he was part of a group of artists who, in an effort to inspire the world to dance, move and absorb the Yolgnu style created the video "Yolgnu Style", a contemporary dance music video.

In 2017 Baker Boy won the Triple J Unearthed National Indigenous Music Awards.

Baker Boy made his acting debut in True History of The Kelly Gang released in cinemas in early January 2019.

He appeared on Playschool as part of NAIDOC week 2019 singing Hickory Dickory Dock.

He has said that he wants to be an inspiration to indigenous kids living in remote communities, and to combat "shame."

Baker Boy appeared on Play School performing a wild and wonderful version of Hickory Dickory Doc!

https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=351200238905619&extid=hECDhu1E49oxvGgI